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Entertainment in Nursing Homes

Many older nursing homes are looking for new and interesting additions to attract residents to their facilities and boost morale in their current residents. Refurbishing the paint or replacing the carpet seems to only gloss over the issue. More nursing homes are offering amenities such as an in-house theatre, viewing popular movies from the resident’s past and new movies sure to tickle a funny bone. 

Adding entertainment adds an aspect of community to the facility and it becomes more than a place for them to live. Building a quiet library, craft room, sports bar, and garden are a few takes on making the residents at home. Activities are then planned around then new features giving the residents the ability to socialize. 

Does mom or dad enjoy playing cards? Some nursing homes hold game time in their larger dining rooms with roaming activities aids to help keep the games rolling. Games such as bingo lend a competitive and sometimes rewarding aspect to social time. 

Would they rather watch the game? A sports lounge with snacks and drinks can lend comfort and fun to the sports enthusiasts day. Watching the game on a larger television with other residents who are fans of their favorite teams add more smiles to their day. 

A community garden can add many different activities to the resident’s daily routine. Cultivating the plants gets those who love the outdoors out to enjoy the sunshine and fresh air. Garden parties, picnics, and a good old fashioned BBQ brings out those who don’t want to go outside often. 

Nursing homes with a higher functioning resident group may also include a swimming pool or optional gym. Some physical therapy groups open their equipment at certain times to allow non-skilled residents to maintain their strength and balance. 

Senior Communities or all types have found addition focusing on the social, emotional, and physical aspects of a resident’s well being has raised the general health of the residents.  Catering to the whole resident, rather than just healthcare, has to lead to more residents calling their facility “my home”.